Agent Running in the Field- By John LeCarré

Book Reviews

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

I must say I love spy novels, those that are really classic style, where the incumbents communicate leaving special bags in shopping malls, or a red x on a rubbish bin in the middle of the street, or use braille on a paper that has been ironed against a piece of cloth. And John LeCarré was the special guy for these type of novels. I read this book because I saw his interview in the Spanish Newspaper El Pais —his real name is David John Moore Cornwell—. He was brilliant. I loved his political audacity, the way he critized his government, nothing politically-correct-out-of-the-sort. Being part of the MI6 in the 1950s and 1960s, he had great material to outsmart his critics and better yet to fed his novels.

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Love in the Time of Cholera —By Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Book Reviews

Rating: 5 out of 5.

It is an outstanding novel. Published in 1985, it is an open window to Garcia Marquez own story. It is based on the romantic love between his parents and all the obstacles they had to overcome to end up being together, with some variations. In the novel, Florentino Ariza, the telegraphist, witnessed how his long time love, Fermina Daza, slipped through his fingers after his love letters chased her for endless months through the whole territory of Colombia. Fermina Daza was taken away by his father, on a long trip on mule, trying to extinguish that flame of love, and he succeeded. When Fermina returned to their home town she saw him and was disappointed. She punished him with an absolute indifference for more than fifty years.

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Living to Tell the Tale — By Gabriel García Márquez

Book Reviews

Rating: 5 out of 5.

This is the story of Gabito, as he was called by his mother and best friends in life. It is a book of a fundamental narrative, that describes the writer’s memories between 1927 and 1950. It is also a story of personal and professional success. A success that was clearly and unequivocally elusive, for many years.

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The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle¬—By Haruki Murakami

Book Reviews

Rating: 5 out of 5.

When I think about Murakami, the first thing that comes to my mind is his amazing way of writing. Every time I dilute myself in his dialogues and thoughts I feel like a little girl, trying to describe a place or a character, even a story. I start by saying what I do since the moment I wake up to the moment I go to bed at night, I describe the places, their smells, flavours, visions and their magic, to then focus on the people that I encounter. I think to whom they look like and what they inspire in me, physically and psychologically, and like that, like a long telephone cable, Murakami connects the dots without falling on boredom or repetition.

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Orlando —By Virginia Woolf

Book Reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

It is said that ‘Orlando’ is one of the finest masterpieces of Virginia Woolf. Published in 1928 it is certainly intense and ahead of its time. It is true that the background of the story involves a very traditional environment, such as the English Court and Queen Elizabeth I, but different to other books depicting this era, the importance of the Queen is left behind to focus more on Orlando as a person.

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A Moveable Feast- By Ernest Hemingway

Book Reviews

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Ernest Hemingway talks in ‘A Moveable Feast’ of when he lost his manuscripts. How painful must have been for a writer that had dedicated his soul and body to give shape to his ideas. We all know how hard it is to lose an important text, but being a young Hemingway, still unsure of his method, without even knowing if that method was reaching its potential and if his lyrics would someday find fame, could have been devastating, as his wife lost his suitcase in a Parisian train station in 1922.

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All The Light We Cannot See -By Anthony Doerr

Book Reviews

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Let me talk today about one of my most precious treasures. As a good treasured it fell into my hands by a simple coincidence. I was in Sydney, where I used to live, and as it always happens —it is still happening to me here in France—, when I cannot find books in Spanish I don’t know what to choose. I was randomly looking inside Harry Hartog, my favourite bookstore in Bondi, when I found it. Strange title, I thought. I then saw a note of recommendation classifying it as one of the best books in fiction. I bought it and left it in my own little library for two months. And when I finally took it  I regret of having lost two months in which I should had known everything about this book.

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Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Book Reviews

Being creative is like playing hide-and-seek. She runs in every direction, I chase her, with all my speed and my strength. She stops, looks at me an laughs. She disappears. I run again, this time determined to catch her, I find her, and I touch her, yes, I think I just touched her, but when I try to grab her from her muscular arm she scapes and runs again, laughing at me, once again.

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The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Book Reviews

It might seem strange to read this book later in life, considering that it is an American classic and it is practically mandatory for a high-schooler in that country to read. It never got my attention, not only because I was not born nor raised in United States, but the previews or an extremely rich party boy were not very attractive.  I am also a big fan of Ernest Hemingway. In his book ‘A Moveable Fist’ he documents some encounters with F. Scott Fitzgerald. He was not impressed. He described him as invasive and difficult to be with. They took a trip together to Lyon (France) that was a disaster. Fitzgerald had alcohol related problems and Hemingway used to say that his texts lacked some strength. However, the same Hemingway loved The Great Gatsby and confirmed him that it was the manuscript that was going to make him famous. It was published in 1925.

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The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin

Book Reviews

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Gretchen Rubin has been famous for some years now. Not to me. I ran into her book by only a coincidence, looking for those books that are chicken soup for the soul. It was the word happiness that got my attention because, Are we not all looking to find it? Is it not the last end of life that all the philosophers talk about? The aim of all religions and theories in this world? She said she could find it and I was up for it.

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